Domestic violence in the NBA

Justin Banks—Staff Writer 

Domestic violence continues to be a frequent discussion topic. Abuse against woman is characterized as any use of “psychological, physical or sexual force, actual or threatened, in an intimate relationship” according to Stop Violence Against Women.  

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said “lesbian, gay and bisexual people experience sexual violence at similar or higher rates than heterosexuals.”  

In a 2015 report, the U.S. Transgender Survey discovered that “47 percent of transgender people are sexually assaulted at some point in their lifetime.”  

Those on social media may have seen the buzz surrounding the Washington Wizards’ center and power forward Dwight Howard’s supposed relationship with a transgender woman. The central conversation has focused on things like how many points Howard averages, when he became gay and if this woman is making up this story.  

Many have neglected the fact that the trans-woman, Masin Elije, has claimed one of Dwight Howard’s employees has threatened her life.  

 

It is disheartening to think that our society has become so fixated of the topic of sexuality and sexual orientation that people have neglected the fact that a human beings life was threatened.  

Many people fail to realize the fear that comes with reporting domestic violence, and this story is one such time where it seems that the majority of people are focused on all the wrong things.  

One Dordt student recalls a time when a friend was in a violent relationship.  

“She was afraid to tell anyone because she was embarrassed about the situation, and she didn’t even reach out for help until the life of her child was threatened.” 

Domestic violence in both heterosexual and homosexual relationships is an alarming problem. When these people find the courage to come out about the problems they are facing, it is important that our collective response should be one of love and compassion, regardless of sexual orientation.   

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